Mapping Feminist LA


Your guide to LA's intersectional communities.

What is the goal of this project?

Mapping Feminist Los Angeles is a working group that aims to build the crowdsourced online and print map, The Angelena Atlas, and to share intersectional feminist resources, services, and events for womxn in Los Angeles County.

Based out of the Women's Center for Creative Work, we are a collective of volunteers who enjoy convening over topics relating to maps, geography, urban design, visual data, and feminism. Our goal is to connect folks to intersectional spaces in Los Angeles through our crowdsourced map, and to activate re-imagined ways of representing the built environment which may include interactive story maps, feminist walks, zines, etc.

We envision our map to be evolving, open source, accessible, and representative of a multitude of identities, lived experiences, and neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

Get on the Map

Know of an intersectional feminist space or resource you think belongs on the map? Share using this quick form

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Meet the MFLA Team

Mapping Feminist Los Angeles is a volunteer working group based out of The Women’s Center for Creative Work. Our team is comprised of a diverse group of feminists drawing from a variety of creative backgrounds. We are unified through our shared passion for mapping, civic participation, geography and community building.

LEANA SCOTT

Founder of Angelena Atlas, Leana Scott is a South Pacific-born Angelena intrigued by the intersection of feminism, art, agile tech development and civic participation. She believes in the expanded roles that both feminism and software hold as important guides in growing empowered communities. Leana’s preferred pronouns are she/her/hers.

BRITTANY ARCENEAUX

Brittany Arceneaux is a New Orleans native working as a Planner and GIS Analyst at the City of Los Angeles Planning Department. Arceneaux's work focuses the application of public participation geographic information systems in community building and equitable reinvestment. She has presented her research at conferences such as the New Orleans Housing Community Development Conference and the National Reclaiming Vacant Properties Conference. She has dedicated years to community technical support and outreach working in both the nonprofit and public sector. Her work has impacted projects with numerous organizations throughout the New Orleans region such as Whodata, NASA Applied Sciences Program, and lowernine.org.

YASMINE BATNIJI

Yasmine Batniji is an interdisciplinary artist based in Los Angeles who uses sound, video, and 3D animation. Her upbringing as an Arab American in the United States informs her art through creating alternative narratives and immersive digital environments. Drawing on issues of intersectionality, she forms hyperreal spaces to address gender, race and international politics.

SUSANNAH LARAMEE KIDD

Susannah Laramee Kidd is an ethnographer, applied researcher, and evaluator invested in the intersection of arts and culture, and civic and community structures. As a Research Analyst for the LA County Arts Commission, she has evaluated public art, social practice, and public engagement projects and initiatives in cultural equity and inclusion in unincorporated LA County neighborhoods. Susannah holds a Ph.D. in Religion and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies from Emory University.Praesent sapien massa, convallis a pellentesque nec, egestas non nisi. Donec sollicitudin molestie malesuada.

ANDREA LOFTHOUSE-QUESADA

Andrea Lofthouse-Quesada is a science teacher, community organizer and artist based in the San Gabriel Valley. In 2015, she founded Crossed Pollinations- a project dedicated to equitable cultural exchange and horticulture. Her botanic illustrations and projects have been presented by institutions throughout the US and China. Andrea holds a M.Ed. from Whittier College and a Graduate Certificate in Scientific Illustration from California State University, Monterey Bay.

NATALJA KENT

Natalja Kent is an artist and photographer based in Los Angeles, CA. Her practice investigates flaws, mechanization, embodiment and disassociation through the expanding parameters of photography. Kent's commercial work includes cultural heritage and studio product photography. Her work can be found at NataljaKent.com and SOManifest.com.

Frequently Asked Questions

The Angelena Atlas is a spatial and digital network that recontextualizes Los Angeles neighborhoods through the filter of intersectional feminism online, in print, and in-person.
Mapping Feminist Los Angeles is a working group that aims to build the crowdsourced online and print map, The Angelena Atlas, and to share intersectional feminist resources, services, and events for womxn in Los Angeles County.

Based out of the Women's Center for Creative Work, we are a collective of volunteers who enjoy convening over topics relating to maps, geography, urban design, visual data, and feminism. Our goal is to connect folks to intersectional spaces in Los Angeles through our crowdsourced map, and to activate re-imagined ways of representing the built environment which may include interactive story maps, feminist walks, zines, etc.

We envision The Angelena Atlas to be evolving, open source, accessible, and representative of a multitude of identities, lived experiences, and neighborhoods in Los Angeles.
“The fact that gender is not an isolated fact about us, but instead intersects with our other identities, is called intersectionality.” ---Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions by Lisa Wade and Myra Marx Ferree

From the Intersectionality Now! zine: “Intersectionality: A framework, a blueprint. A feminism that sees your multiple identities and acknowledges that you live them all at once, all of the time. A feminism that works for gender equity AND an end to ALL the interconnected systems of oppression that affect ALL OF US in different ways.”

Intersectionality is a term that was coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989 in response to the fact that Black liberationist politics and white feminism have not reflected the experiences of Black women, whose lives are affected by both racism and sexism. If you want to read more, here is a link to an early article by Kimberle Crenshaw exploring the idea of intersectionality http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/uclf/vol1989/iss1/8 and a syllabus of other resources you might explore: http://intersectionalactivism.com/
We have included organizations on this map that are active in fighting oppression in diverse areas of work. These organizations may not have explicit intersectional feminist statements or commitments, but they all work to improve the lives of women and address women’s experiences in and through all of their intersecting identities. This means that we have included organizations doing anti-racism work or working with low-income communities, even if they serve communities other than women.

At this time, we have decided not to include retail spaces on our map, although we recognize the tradition of feminist book stores and other spaces that have been powerful forces in feminist work. If an organization contains a retail operation, that organization must be a 501(c)3 and the primary mission of the organization must be something other than retail. While it could be a useful project, we have not set out to map women-owned businesses.

Maps are like any knowledge generating process and any display of information in that how a map is framed and who or what is included on a map can reveal or obscure many different social realities. For this reason, we have tried to be very thoughtful about how we are defining an intersectional feminist resource (see above).

We recognize that traditional maps are designed with a person of privilege as their intended users and are not accessible to everyone. To the best of our ability, we are including data on the map about ADA accessibility and languages spoken. We hope to be able to provide translations for our text materials in the future.

We recognize that online resources are not accessible or comfortable for everyone. Therefore, the first iteration of our map will be available as a printed zine for those who prefer to navigate information on paper or offline. We hope that we can get this zine into people’s hands through outreach events around LA.

We hope to build a dataset of intersectional feminist resources that we will publish in print zine and in an online map.
We hope to build a website that will display this database in a searchable, interactive format and allow individuals to add locations to the map and allow the entries to be moderated. In other words, entries will have to be reviewed for completeness and appropriateness before appearing on the map.
We hope to include an events feature on the map for one time or temporary ongoing events that would be of intersectional interest.
We hope to host outreach events to connect people to these resources in real life, perhaps by hosting feminist walking tours.

We recognize that a small group of ad hoc volunteers will not have representation from every identity, experience, or expertise. Still, we are committed to an inclusive decision-making process in which someone who is affected by an issue would be the ultimate decision-maker about what relevant resources should be included on the map. So, we are recruiting such individuals to advise us and keep us accountable to the multiple communities that we hope to serve through this resource. If you would like to serve in this capacity or know someone who would be good for this role, please contact us.

Nope, and we want you to be a part of it! You can submit a location for the map here .

Come to a meeting and give us your thoughts. Or just sign up to receive updates on our progress here.

Current needs: UX designers, front end developers, back end developers.

Individuals with experience or expertise in health & wellness, anti-racism, mass Incarceration, immigrant resources, housing, disabilities, and arts & culture to join our working group, or to serve on our advisory council.

Who can join the project? Everyone! No coding or tech experience is required to attend meetings.

Please fill this form out to suggest a location for the map.

Entries on the map come to us in several ways. Volunteers who come to our meetings suggest entries for the map. We solicit entries at outreach events. Anyone can submit an organization through our website. Members of the advisory council, who are volunteers recruited for their experience and/or expertise in a particular area of intersectional feminism, review the suggestions on a periodic basis.

LA is a big place and we may never be done mapping all of the intersectional feminist resources that are here. We’re adding to the map all of the time, so if we’ve missed something you think should be on the map, please submit it here here .


Stay connected

Thank you for your interest in this collaborative research project.

We are curious about questions and feedback you may have, drop us a comment here.